• Let’s celebrate these conservation success stories from around Australia

    March 2, 2022 • LIFE

    March 3rd is World Wildlife Day, an international day to celebrate and raise awareness of the world’s wild animals and plants.

    The theme for 2022 is Recovering Key Species for Ecosystem Restoration. Restoration of ecosystems, if combined with stopping further conversion of natural ecosystems, may help avoid 60% of expected biodiversity extinctions.

    There’s much work to be done in the area and further afield to combat the climate crisis but for now let’s celebrate some conservation success stories and projects from around Australia.

    Critically endangered Brush-tail Bettongs are thriving on the Yorke Peninsula

    Photo by Marna Banggara

    Photo by Marna Banggara

    Brush-tail Bettongs were once found across 60% of the Australian mainland. As part of the Marna Banggara conservation project, 40 bettongs (also known as woylies) were re-located from Wedge Island in Western Australia, to the Yorke Peninsula where they are thriving.

    Marna Banggara is working to return locally-extinct species and restore natural processes to the area. It is the first project of its kind in Australia to apply rewinding techniques into a working landscape, rather than a closed reserve.

    Learn more about the project here >

    The Humpback Whale no longer listed as endangered

    Photo by Pete Lynch as published on ABC News

    Photo by Pete Lynch, as published on ABC News

    Humpbacks were nearly hunted to extinction in the 1900s, however a ban on commercial whaling has since allowed the humpback whale to recover.

    Learn more here >

    Native forrest logging banned in Western Australia from 2024

    Photo by Mark Boskell as published on The Guardian

    Photo by Mark Boskell as published on The Guardian

    This will preserve at least 400,000 hectares of Karri, Jarrah and Wandoo forests, which are endemic to Western Australia.

    Learn more here >

    Eastern Barred Bandicoot is making a come back in Victoria!

    Photo by Sam Rye / Conservation Volunteers Australia as published on Australian Geographic

    Photo by Sam Rye / Conservation Volunteers Australia as published on Australian Geographic

    Once common across much of Western Victoria, populations declined after extensive land clearing and the introduction of feral cats and foxes during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Numbers dwindled to 150. Now, through conservation efforts the number sits at nearly 1500.

    Learn more here >

    Sniffer dogs are helping researchers find platypus burrows

    Photo by Zoos Victoria as published on The Guardian

    Photo by Zoos Victoria as published on The Guardian

    This allows scientists to collect data on platypus populations and learn more about these elusive monotremes.

    Learn more here >

    Want to learn more about World Wildlife Day?

    You can do that right here >